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New Generac technology allows customers to sell power back to the grid

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Generac’s headquarters in the Town of Genesee

A new technology that Generac Power Systems integrated with several of its products will allow customers to sell power back to the grid to make money and offset their energy costs.

Called “Smart Grid Ready,” the technology was added to its home standby generators, commercial and industrial generators as well as its PWRcell Solar + battery storage systems, according to the company.

The new technology stems from Generac’s acquisition of Denver-based Enbala Power Networks Inc. in 2020. The Town of Genesee-based company has long held a vision of creating a power distribution model with its products that is digitized, decentralized and more resilient than the centralized power distribution model of today.

Customers can tap into the company’s Smart Grid Ready capabilities through Generac’s Enbala Concerto platform. The platform turns customer products into distributed energy resources or “virtual power plants” which can be used to augment grid services provided by traditional power generation.

Generac products will still function as backup power devices in the event of a power outage but will now enable customers to sell power back to the grid in times of peak demand.

Current PWRcell and home standby generator customers are also able to access Generac’s Concerto platform through a firmware update, providing existing users with the same capabilities that will come standard with new products.

“Climate change and an aging electrical grid are making power outages and power shortages more frequent and longer-lasting,” Generac president and CEO Aaron Jagdfeld said in a statement. “With Smart Grid Ready, consumers can play a key role in being part of the solution. In addition to the peace of mind that they’re receiving from Generac products, customers have the opportunity to obtain an additional return on investment by leveraging their Generac units to contribute energy to the grid, support grid stability and receive payment for their excess power.”

Brandon covers startups, technology, manufacturing. He previously worked as a general assignment and court reporter for The Freeman in Waukesha. Brandon graduated from UW-Milwaukee’s journalism, advertising and media studies program with an emphasis in journalism. He enjoys live music, playing guitar and loves to hacky sack.


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